Example of a J-term syllabus

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Week One

Monday, January 3: 

 

Theme of the day: Introductions, Course Context and Expectations, Basic Concepts

Morning: Introductions—International Delegates, faculty, and graduate teaching assistants

Why this class?

Basic Concepts: What is Science? What is Research? What is the Scientific Method?

Prof. Bob Swap: “Hello – I am here to save the world” – Ethical issues to consider before the research begins; What is the student’s role in the undergraduate experience here at the University?

Loren Intolubbe-Chmil: Course evaluation/pre-survey

Afternoon: Breakout Groups: Focus on Ethics and Research Interests

Readings (to discuss on Jan 3): 

Butin: Chapter 1

Bless et al. Chapter 1, The Different Methods of Acquiring Knowledge and Chapter 2, The Scientific Method Applied to Social Reality

Francis L. Macrina, Chapters 1&2 (Website).

Optional:

Shamoo and Resnik, Chapters 1&2 (Website)

Washington Post Article – December 13, 2009

Tuesday, January 4:   

 

Theme of the day: Issues of Lifescapes and Landscapes and Views from across the World

 

Morning:  Introduction and perspectives from Visiting Delegations by themes:

Speakers and Short Presentations by Representatives from Human/Education and Community/Social/Health Groups;

Their Take on the Research Process – followed by short group discussion

1)    Human/Education Panel: Presentations on community-based  research from the perspective of international experts: Duncan  Nengwenani, , James Ngundi , Michael Wairungu, Loren Intolubbe-Chmil

2)    Community/Health Panel: Presentations on community-based research from the perspective of international experts: Carolina Ramoa, Tashi Deykid, Krishna Gurung, Mavis Raphulu

Afternoon: Introduction and perspectives from Visiting Delegations by themes:

Speakers and Short Presentations by Representatives from Economic and Environmental Groups;

Their Take on the Research Process – followed by short group discussion

3)    Economic Panel: Presentations on community-based research from the perspective of international experts: Gitile Naituli, Andre Ribeiro, Kenneth Dabkowski, Caroline Berinyuy

4)    Environmental Panel: Presentations on community-based research from the perspective of international experts: Leonardo Antonio, Natasha Ribeiro, Teresia Francis, Shuaib Lwasa

Processing Talks and Readings: Student Group Activity followed by Wrap up Exercise

Readings (to discuss on Jan 4):

Chambers, Chapter 4: Whose Knowledge

Bless, et.al., Chapter 5: The Types of Research

Optional Reading:

J. van Rensburg, (Ed.) “Environmental Education, Ethics and Action in Southern Africa,” Collab site.

Wednesday, January 5: 

Theme of the day: Amplifying Voices –  A Tibetan Case Study

Morning: Brief discussion of the previous day’s reading assignment

Guest Lecturer, Healthy Appalachia Project

 

Afternoon:  Recognizing our own voice and biases – Observations From the Field

Readings (to discuss on Jan 5):

Butin, Chapter 2: Limits of Service Learning

“Remote and Poked:  Anthropology’s Dream Tribe,” Collab site.

Thursday, January 6: 

Theme of the day: The research process and ethical concerns with perspectives from both home and abroad

Morning: 

1)    Debrief readings/presentations; Guided questions facilitated by international visitors 

2)    Guest Lecturer, Chris Colvin, University of Capetown, South Africa 

3)    IRB presentation  

 

The Practice or rather ‘How to’ of Social and Physical Research

 

Afternoon:

Interactive Participatory Action Research Seminar: Carol Anne Spreen and Salim Vally

Readings:

“Responsibility of Research,” University of Virginia protocols; Read site and examine the submission forms here: http://www.virginia.edu/vprgs/rsrchrespons.html 

Bless et al.  Chapter 10 – Research Ethics

Bless et al. Chapter 6 – Community Centered Research 

Chambers Chapters 1 and 2 on Project Biases and Different Cultures of Outsiders

Vally and Spreen, Learning From and Learning In Communities: Participatory Research on Collab

 

Friday, January 7:  Class meets 9:30-12:00; 1:00-3:30 pm

 

Theme of the day: Team Building, Project Design and Final Project Planning

Morning:  Prof. Swap to present on expectations of the final project process from team building to project design to final project presentation (1.5 hours)

International visitors to facilitate group project designs

11:00 until 1:30pm – students to work, discuss and divide into no more than six research project teams

 

Afternoon : student groups share group breakdown and general group ideas and then matched with international research mentors on shaping the project and work/research assignments for the weekend.

  • Short essays (ca. 750-1000 words) are due in class on Monday January 11.  × 

Readings of interest and or potential help for student groups posted on Collab site:

Bless et al. Chapter 7 – 9 (Design, Sampling and Data Collection)

NSF “Looking Beyond Borders…” NSF Best Practices Handbook for International Research Experience for Students, Collab site.

WEEK TWO

 Class meets Monday-Friday,  9:30-12:00 and 1:00-3:30 pm

 

Monday January 10: 

 

Theme of the day: Rights Based Approach to Research both Home and Abroad

 

Morning: 09:30 – 10:15 Student Groups to Brief International Mentors on Progress 

 

10:30 – 12:00 Panel Discussion Regarding Human Rights 

 

Afternoon: Facilitated small group meetings continued work on Final Project –with faculty mentor

Tuesday January 11:

Theme of the day: A Student’s View of the International Research Process 

Morning:  Project Teams meet independently for final preparation of Project Presentations with Practice presentations and constructive feedback.

 

Afternoon: Former students present on their research and experience with international work and share their insights and lessons learned. 

 

Wednesday January 12:  Class meets 9:30-12:00; 1:00-3:30 

 

Theme of the Day: Final Project Proposal Presentations and Student Feedback

 

Morning: – Project Teams meet individually with class faculty to review their project proposal progress and presentation preparation and 1 page project summary statement

 

Working for Change

 

Afternoon:  Guest Lecturer 

 

Thursday  January 13:

 

Theme of the Day: Mock Presentations to Faculty and Mentors for Constructive Criticism

 

Friday January 14: 

 

Theme of the Day: Final Project Presentations to Faculty, Mentors and Guests

 

Afternoon – 13:00-16:30 FINAL GROUP PRESENTATIONS: 20 mins with 10 mins of Q&A.

 

 5:00pm Reception for Jterm International Guests, Friends, Faculty and Students

The Colonnade Hotel

  •  Final Student Papers / Group Summaries due on Monday January 17.  ×